Psychology Department

Gallery

"Vision and Art: The Biology of Seeing"
an illustrated lecture by

Dr. Margaret Livingston,
Professor of Neurobiology, Harvard University
http://neuro.med.harvard.edu/site/faculty/livingstone.html

De Young Museum San Francisco, April 21st 2006

 

"Biology of Seeing Award": Professor Charles Ramskov with his Teacher Assistant Cristina Gatti and two students of the General Psychology Class who partecipate at the "Biology of Seeing" Award.

Professor Charles Ramskov with his Teacher Assistant Cristina Gatti and two students of the General Psychology Class who particpated at the Biology of Seeing Award.From left:Imelda Lim, Min-Hui Chu (the winner),Charles Ramskov and Cristina Gatti.



Stanford Honor Thesis Lecture

De Anza College Human Experimental Psychology Course Presents

Stanford Department of Psychology Honors Thesis
TUESDAY, JUNE 20th 2006

 

Matt, Nick and Charles Ramskov: Professor Charles Ramskov with Matt Estrada (left) and Nick Hollon (right)after the Honor Thesis Lecture at the Human Experimental Psycology class at De Anza

Professor Charles Ramskov with Matt Estrada (left) and Nick Hollon (right)after the Honor Thesis Lecture at the Human Experimental Psycology class at De Anza College.

 

Matt Estrada �When remembering causes forgetting: negative affect and retrieval-induced forgetting�

Many studies implicate the process of remembering itself as a mechanism of forgetting. Retrieval-induced forgetting refers to the phenomenon whereby memory for studied words sharing a cue will be differentially affected by practicing retrieval for some of the words prior to test. Studies also demonstrate the fact that negative emotional memory traces perseverate in memory. This study investigated the degree to which perseverant negative memories are susceptible to mnemonic suppression using the retrieval-induced forgetting paradigm. Ss (N=18) studied 15 categories, each consisting of one cue coupled with three neutrally and three negatively valenced associate words (6 associates total). Directly following the study phase, Ss completed a cued-recall task to practice retrieval for 3 targets from ten of the fifteen categories. A final cued-recall test revealed slight performance impairments for unpracticed negatively-valenced associate words in practiced categories, in accordance with the theory that competitive memory retrieval recruits an inhibitory mechanism and can cause long term forgetting effects.

 

Naila and Matt: Matt Estrada answering the student Naila Qureshi after his lecture: <u>"When Remembering causes forgetting: negative affect and retrieval induced forgetting"</u>

Matt Estrada answering the student Naila Qureshi after his lecture: "When Remembering causes forgetting: negative affect and retrieval induced forgetting"

 

Nick Hollon �Close to me: the neural basis of self-referential and close others-referential memory�

Advisors: Rebecca Ray and James Gross, Psychophysiology Lab,Stanford University

The Self-Reference Effect refers to superior memory for information encoded in reference to the self. Neuroimaging studies have found self-referential processing to be associated with activations in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and have concluded that MPFC activity is responsible for the memory advantage for self-referential encoding. One puzzle, however, is that prior studies using an interpersonally close other as a referent condition have found that this close other processing also recruits MPFC activity, but does not produce the same memory advantage as self-referential encoding. The present fMRI study compared the neural correlates of relating words to the self versus relating words to a close other, namely one�s mother. Extensive MPFC activation was found for both the Self and Close Other conditions. A sub-cluster in the MPFC showed greater activation for Self when directly contrasted with Close Other. Functional connectivity analyses using MPFC voxels as a seed region of interest revealed common networks of correlated activity for both the Self and Close Other conditions. Distinct connectivity between the MPFC and right hippocampus was found in the Self condition and may provide evidence consistent with the memory advantage observed for self-referential encoding.

 

Nick Hollon: Nick Hollon presenting his Honor Thesis: <u>"Close to me: the neural basis of self-referential and close to others-referential memory"</u>

Nick Hollon presenting his Honor Thesis: "Close to me: the neural basis of self-referential and close to others-referential memory"





Psychology Lab L-27
Contact: Charles B. Ramskov
Phone: 408.864.8853
Building: Office F21a
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Last Updated: 9/14/08