Sunken Garden Fountain View

Governance

Glossary of Terms

Administrative Management Association (AMA)
AMA is a “meet and confer” association that represents administrators in the district.

Campus Center Advisory Board
The Campus Center Advisory Board makes recommendations to the Campus Center administrative staff concerning major policy issues, facility renovations, the financial condition of the Campus Center, planned major facility and day-to-day operations changes

Campus Facilities

The Campus Facilities Group Reviews program and service proposals to determine the impact on current and proposed facilities, and make long-term recommendations for physical plant facilities including buildings, grounds and custodial care.

 College Environmental Advisory Group

CEAG is a committee that monitors and makes recommendations to appropriate individuals and groups regarding college and district policies relating to environmentally sound practices. CEAG embraces and fosters principles of sustainability as core values.

College Planning Committee (CPC)

The College Planning Committee (CPC) is a subcommittee of the College Council. Its purpose is to systematically review all aspects of the six-year planning cycle including calendar, mission, and governance.

Curriculum Committee
The Curriculum Committee strives to ensure that De Anza’s curriculum is academically sound, comprehensive, responsive to the evolving needs and multiple perspectives of the community, and in compliance with Title 5, Section 55002 and all other applicable regulations and requirements.

Developmental & Readiness Education (DARE)
DARE is a task force charged with the development of a campus-wide plan to streamline and structure the flow of students from the point of entry, through student support and academic courses, to their final objectives. Future objectives will be identified by the taskforce itself, by grant objectives (including Title III and BSI) and through future planning retreats.

Diversity Advisory Council
The Diversity Advisory Council promotes a climate of respect and appreciation for diversity and inclusiveness in all aspects of the college.

Multicultural Staff Association (MSA)

The Multicultural Staff Association (MSA) functions in an advocacy role for multicultural issues that include equity in hiring, student equity and campus/district diversity. 

Student Learning Outcomes Steering Committee (SLO)
The SLO Steering Committee ensures that the De Anza College has established and institutionalized cyclical learning outcomes and assessment cycle processes and procedures that implemented throughout the college.

Technology Task Force (Tech Task Force)
Tech Task Force is an advisory group to De Anza’s College Council regarding technology products and solutions.

A Budgets
This is the cost of the full-time contracted salaries and benefits, and certain other items such as leases, utilities, etc.

Automatic Budget Reallocation (ABR)
This in an acronym for “automatic budget reallocation.” The theory is that you can budget in a broad category like a 4000 ABR, and when money is spent from a specific object code i.e. 4010 it will first deduct from that code. If there is no money available in 4010 it will pull money automatically from the 4000 ABR pool. The financial reports show a negative budget amount if the ABR does not have enough money. ABRs are used for all major budget categories such as 1100, 2000, 4000, etc.

B Budgets
This represents discretionary funding for the college. It is used for supplies, casual hourly employees and all other operating expenses such as repairs, postage, etc., that are the college’s obligation. It is distinguished from A budgets, which represent the contracted salaries of faculty and classified staff and other agreed upon expenses such as facilities rental, utilities, negotiated release time, etc. The amount of the B budget is set through an historic formula that allocates money to the campus. This amount is then augmented by the income that the campus generates. This campus-generated income includes instructional materials, parking fines, sale of catalogues and schedules, registration enrollment fees, transcript fees and a host of other minor fees/revenues. We have used another term for the capital outlay budgets, the C budgets, but the C budget has become the same as the B budget in Fund 14 since there is no separate allocation for Fund 14 capital budgets. Other parts of the capital budget get a little confusing because the state allocates restricted money to the district for instructional equipment and scheduled maintenance. The amount of money varies year to year as determined by the state budget process. These instructional equipment funds and scheduled maintenance funds are recorded and spent in Fund 21 and Fund 76 respectively, because they are restricted by the state for specific purposes.

Base Apportionment  (“The Base”)
The total unrestricted general funding amount from the state. It includes “foundation” funding for essential operations (this amount depends on the number and size of colleges and centers in the district) plus a fixed amount per FTES up to the district’s CAP.

Budget Transfers
These are for transferring money from one account to another. The appropriate budgeter must sign off on it. You cannot transfer from A budget to B budget or between funds (i.e. categorical project to the General Fund 14).

Campus Center Use Fee Fund 28
Revenue for this fund is generated by a mandatory fee for use of the Campus Center. The proceeds are used for payment of the bonds and COPS, which financed the construction of the building.

CAP
The number of resident FTES the state funds the district to teach each year. In a “non-growth” year, the goal is always to serve exactly this number of FTES to maximize funding from the state while minimizing expenses.

If over CAP, the district is serving the extra students for “free”; that is, the district does not get funding for the FTES beyond the CAP, unless, as in some years, the state makes growth funding available (this year growth funding is 2.1 percent).

If under CAP, the district is serving fewer students than the state is prepared to fund. This year (2010-2011) the district is projecting that we will be under CAP by about 4 percent. The state doesn’t take back the funding promised for this year, but next year our CAP will be reduced, resulting in a corresponding drop in the funding for next year. If under CAP, we also miss out on any additional growth funds available.

Capital Projects Fund 76
This fund is used for state money directed toward major building projects, instructional equipment allocations and state scheduled maintenance projects.

Categorical Fund 21
This fund handles all the local, state and federal grants that are received by the college. Large grant programs would include Matriculation, NASA, EOPS, VTEA, Health Services and many other smaller programs.

Child Development Fund 26
This fund is established for the operation of the Child Development Center. The revenue comes from parent fees, as well as local, state and federal grants.

De Anza Associated Student Body (DASB) Fund 148
This fund records all the student body revenue from card sales, fund-raisers and flea markets. The revenues are used for the operations of the DASB, the clubs and support of the college.

Deficit Factor
Each year the state promises to fund the district with a certain dollar amount of BASE apportionment. Later, the state can impose a “deficit factor” which is essentially a percentage decrease in the promised funding. So, if a 1 percent deficit factor is imposed, our BASE would be reduced, and, in effect, we would only get $4,257 (99 percent of $4,300) per FTES instead of $4,300. A deficit factor doesn’t change the CAP. The district still serves the same number of students but gets less for doing it. Deficit factors are typically announced mid-year, after the budgeting has occurred. As a “just in case” measure, our district sometimes builds a deficit factor into our budget, and, if it doesn’t materialize, then this amount drops as a surplus to the bottom line.

Educational Trust Fund
A district fund established that rewards the college’s productivity.

Enterprise Fund 148
This fund is established for the Bookstore, Food Services and maintenance of the Campus Center Building. It is designed to be self-sufficient so that revenues from the operations cover the costs of sales, labor and maintenance.

Expenses Transfers
This is used to transfer the expense for a specific transaction from one account to another. Specific detail of the expense must accompany the transfer (i.e. a copy of the MER). The budgeter of the account where the expense will be charged must sign the transfer.

50 Percent Law
Fifty percent of all Unrestricted General Fund expenses must be spent on the direct cost of instruction (Ed. Code Section 84362). This provision drives some of the decisions on budget cuts. Currently, the district is trying to keep our percent spent on direct instruction about the same as in past, slightly above the 50 percent required. Upcoming cuts can’t come exclusively from cutting classes since that would put us below the required 50 percent.

Financial Aid Fund 37, 38, 39
These funds are used for federal and state financial aid programs, such as Pell Grants, SEOG, Perkins, etc.

Float
When a regular full-time employee resigns or retires from a position, the dollars freed up while the position is vacant are called float dollars. The district has an automatic procedure in place where those dollars are moved from the budget account to a campus-wide salary lapse account as B budget. Classified float is the equivalent of the actual rate the incumbent was being paid at the time he or she left the position. These float dollars can normally be used to hire casual hourly replacements while the position in vacant. Certificated non-teaching positions also generate float in the same manner. In these cases, float dollars are converted into hourly teaching dollars until the position is refilled. Float can also be used for other discretionary purposes within the college besides salary backfilling.

Faculty Obligation Number (FON – also used in enrollment management)
Created when AB1725 passed, the FON is the number of full-time faculty that the district must employ. It changes as our CAP changes. The state calculates the FON proportioned to the CAP increase and informs the district as to what this number is each year. If we don’t match or go over the FON, the state withholds funding from the district. The rationale for the withholding is to offset any savings the district would get by employing part-time faculty instead of hiring full-time faculty. The FON represents “true” full-time faculty, not FTEF, which includes part-time faculty load bundled together. Meeting the FON requirement explains why full-time faculty are sometimes hired during program reductions and employee layoffs.

General FundFund 14
This is the general operating fund of the district. Basically everything happens here unless the state designates a fund to be set up for a special purpose. This is the fund that receives the state apportionment and property taxes for income and pays most of the expenses of the teaching and support staff in addition to all the operating expenses like the B budget and utilities, etc.

Growth Mode
This is an operating mode in which the district wants to get additional funding from the state by serving more students than in the prior year. In the years that the state builds growth money into its budget, serving extra students is not a risk, as long as the district doesn’t grow more than the percent allowed. In this mode, because the district is not as concerned about high productivity (full classes) as about enrolling as many students as possible, classes are allowed to “make” below the minimum enrollment number, which is typically 20 students per class. The district is now in an atypical Growth Mode, offering more classes because we are under CAP. The long-term impact of being under CAP and having our BASE permanently drop is worth the one or two quarters of expense to run some classes under 20.

Lottery
This is the most misunderstood aspect of school finance. The bottom line is that we receive about $3.1 million dollars each year from lottery revenues. This represents about 2.8% of our total income. The funds are discretionary and become part of the general Fund 14 revenue sources.

ParkingFund 25
This fund is established to receive revenue from the sale of parking decals and permits. The fees are then used to make payments on the loan that was used to build the parking garage at
De Anza, for the parking security officers and for other parking lot maintenance costs.

Productivity Mode
This is an operating mode in which the district is on track to meet the CAP, so it tries to serve the students we have as efficiently as possible, that is, with as few salary dollars as possible. In this mode, fewer sections are offered to get more students to enroll in each one, and classes below the minimum enrollment number of 20 are cancelled. Efforts are made via e-mails to get the students from cancelled classes to enroll in other open sections.

Professional Development Leaves (PDL) Backfill
We also receive funds to back fill Professional Development Leaves (PDL) granted to certificated staff, and Staff Development Leaves (SDL) granted to classified staff. In these cases, the calculation on PDL and SDL backfill is slightly different than float. Classified SDL backfill is calculated at the part-time hourly rate equivalent to Step A of the salary range of the incumbent. This amount of money would be enough to hire casual hourly replacements. Certificated non-teaching and teaching PDL backfill is calculated at the part-time hourly rate (about 70% of the full-time rate).

Revenue and Cap
The base revenue we receive from the state is based on the FTES we generate. Generally, the more FTES we generate the more money we receive from the state. However, the state limits the growth in community colleges by a variety of formulas. In our case, we are generally limited to (capped at) a 1% growth rate. We are at cap now, so any funding for growth above the 1% allocated growth cannot be guaranteed from year to year. It is through this method that we receive more than 85% of our annual revenue each year (over $93 million dollars district-wide).

Self-SupportFund 15
This is technically a sub-fund of the general fund, but programs are set up here to be self-sustaining. That is, they generally have a source of revenue like the Community Development Program and are expected to pay for all their own expenses. The Reprographics Department is another example of a self-sustaining department that relies primarily on charge-backs from the college to operate.

Special Education/DSPSFund 22
This fund is set up for the special education programs of the college. It receives restricted income from the state for the programs as well as general apportionment funding generated by special education students in regular classes.

Workload Reduction
This occurs when, as part of a funding reduction, the state makes proportional reductions in the district’s CAP to hold funding per FTES constant. In this case, the workload of the district is reduced and there will likely be fewer Article 7
assignments and perhaps program reductions. Still, this is the “better” option in budget cutting times: the number of students the district serves drops by the same percentage that state funding drops. The worse option is that the state cuts our budget and keeps the CAP the same, which means the district must serve the same number of students with less money.

Work Study Fund 23
This fund is used to channel federal financial aid dollars to qualified students on financial aid.

 *sources: Budget Committee website (http://www.deanza.edu/budgetinfo/glossary.html)  and Faculty Association Newsletter, 4/25/2011 (http://fafhda.edu)

Faculty Association (FA)
FA is a locally governed, independent association incorporated in 1977 by the faculty in this district to represent themselves pursuant to the California Public Employees Relations Act of 1976. FA and the Foothill-De Anza Board of Trustees collectively bargain decisions on salary, hours of work, academic calendar, hiring practices, class size and other terms and conditions of employment at Foothill and De Anza colleges.

Association of Classified Employees (ACE)
ACE is the exclusive bargaining representative for all classified workers holding those positions listed in Appendix E and all classified hourly workers holding those positions listed in Appendix E.1 of the ACE Agreement.

California School Employees Association (CSEA)
CSEA is the bargaining group that represents workers in the skilled trades and crafts.

Teamsters
Teamsters Local 287 is the exclusive bargaining unit for all supervisory positions in the distric

Census
Students are counted about the third week of the quarter, known as “census week.” Full-Time Equivalent Student (FTES) is defined as 12 hours/week = 525 weekly student contact hours (WSCH).

Faculty Obligation Number (FON also used in budget terms)
Created when AB1725 passed, the FON is the number of full-time faculty that the district must employ. It changes as our CAP changes. The state calculates the FON proportioned to the CAP increase and informs the district as to what this number is each year. If we don’t match or go over the FON, the state withholds funding from the district. The rationale for the withholding is to offset any savings the district would get by employing part-time faculty instead of hiring full-time faculty. The FON represents “true” full-time faculty, not FTEF, which includes part-time faculty load bundled together. Meeting the FON requirement explains why full-time faculty is sometimes hired during program reductions and employee layoffs.

Full-Time Equivalent Faculty (FTEF)
Full-Time Equivalent Faculty, a load of 100% (range of 95% to 105%) taught by one instructor (full-time) or several instructors (part-time).

Full Time Equivalent Student (FTES) Computation
In a quarter environment, during census week, to compute FTES you would do the following calculation:

  1. There are 175 days of instruction in an academic year (the state defines this). This results in 35 weeks of instruction in an academic year (excluding summer quarter). 175/5 days per week = 35 weeks per year. There are 11.67 weeks in a quarter (35 weeks per year / 3 quarters)
  2. Multiply the number of hours a class meets per week (WSCH) for that quarter by 11.67 to project for the year.
  3. Divide this by 525 to obtain the FTES.

Full-Time Faculty Obligation (FTFO)
There is a state regulation that requires community college districts to hire a minimum number of full-time (FT) faculty each year. The district’s FTFO is 516 (2010-11).

Load
The class “productivity” would be calculated as follows:

  1. Assume that an Accounting 1A load factor equals .0830 for 1 quarter or .25 for the year (three quarters). (That is, the instructor would have to teach 4 of these classes per quarter, for three quarters to make up his or her full load for the year.)
  2. If there were 140 hours of enrollment for that class for that quarter, / by .25 (quarter load factor of .0830 x 3 quarters) load factor for that class, the productivity = 560 WSCH/FTEF.

The financial impact on the district for changes in WSCH/FTE is enormous. For example, if the WSCH/FTE drops by 10 points from 530 to 520, the district revenue would be reduced by $600,000.

Productivity
The term refers to the efficiency with which we use our resources. It is figured by dividing the quarterly WSCH by the quarterly FTEF. Because FTEF is also an annualized term, productivity can also be figured by dividing the WSCH by 3 times the Load Factor. The district budgets for a productivity of 530.

Workload Reduction
This occurs when, as part of a funding reduction, the state makes proportional reductions in the district’s CAP to hold funding per FTES constant. In this case, the workload of the district is reduced and there will likely be fewer Article 7
assignments and perhaps program reductions. Still, this is the “better” option in budget cutting times: the number of students the district serves drops by the same percentage that state funding drops. The worse option is that the state cuts our budget and keeps the CAP the same, which means the district must serve the same number of students with less money.

WSCH Definition (Commonly pronounced as “wish”)
WSCH is an acronym for weekly student contact hours. These types of calculations on an individual class roll up to the collegewide totals, where we convert to FTES and report to the state. We are paid on the basis of FTES by the state, so you will hear many references to “WSCH producing classes” because it drives so much of our district income.

WSCH Computation
For an Accounting 1A class that meets 4 hours per week (4 unit class), and there are 35 enrollees at census date, the FTES would be computed as follows:

  1. 35 enrollees multiplied by 4 hours per week = 140 hours of enrollment in the census week, which computes to 140 WSCH.

Campus Budget Team

The Campus Budget Team recommends to College Council the adequate allocation of resources in support of the college as set forth by College Council; to support prudent budget management; and to identify unfunded and under-funded activities and needs.

College Council

The College Council is the governance body at De Anza that represents all stakeholders at the college (campus representative groups, advisory groups, constituent groups, and bargaining units) and provides recommendations to the college President.

Finance & Educational Resources Planning & Budget Team (FERPBT)

The FERPBT provides leadership and coordination for the development and implementation of finance and educational resource planning and budget processes that support institutional strategic goals and priorities and the college’s Educational Master Plan.

Instructional Planning & Budget Team (IPBT)

The IPBT provides leadership and coordination for the development and implementation of instructional planning and budget processes that support institutional strategic goals and priorities and the college’s Educational Master Plan.

Student Services Planning & Budget (SSPBT)

The SSPBT provides leadership and coordination for the development and implementation of Student Services planning and budget processes that support institutional strategic goals and priorities and the college’s Educational Master Plan.

Academic Senate

The Academic Senate represents full and part-time faculty in the formation of college and district policies on academic and professional matters. It exercises primary reliance on curriculum, general education and program specific degree and certificate requirements, grading policies, standards regarding student preparation and success, and policies for faculty professional development. Joint development (with the Board) areas include degree and certificate units, educational program development, governance structures, accreditation, policies for program review, and processes for institutional planning and budget development.

Classified Senate

The De Anza College Classified Senate represents all classified staff who choose to participate, regardless of classification, and who are not management or certificated, as defined by Education Code Section 72400 and Foothill-De Anza Community College District Board Policy 2610.1. Specifically, the De Anza Senate represents all classified staff members who work on the De Anza campus. The function of the Classified Senate is to participate in governance of De Anza College, to provide a centralized means of communication among classified staff and with the rest of the college community, to actively promote professionalism with the Classified Senate, and to enhance staff development.

DASB

The De Anza Associated Student Body (DASB) works to provide for both fair and equal representation of students at the college, district, state and federal levels; the availability and accessibility of all services and facilities to our student body populous in promotion of a total educational and recreational experience at De Anza College.


Administrative Unit Outcome (AUO)

The De Anza administration, faulty and staff work in concert to define and assess Administrative Unit Outcomes that are overarching, clear, and assessable statements that identify and define what a client/customer/student will be able to know, do or feel at the successful completion of a specific activity or process.  In general, programs that do not directly work with students or play a non-academic role (Grounds, Custodial, Dining Services, Staff Development, Budget Office, Payroll, etc.) will conduct AUO assessment cycles.

Assessment Cycle (AC)

Each outcome (SLO/SSLO/AUO) needs to be assessed on an ongoing, cyclical basis.   The AC consists of three Phases.

  • Phase I: writing of the outcome statement.
  • Phase II: assessment of the outcome statement using an appropriate assessment method and the collection of data. 
  • Phase III: reflection and enhancement where members of the assessment team reflect on the data collected to first analyze the data as well as reflect on the assessment process itself.  The team will then determine if the outcome goal has been satisfied and decide on what enhancements are needed to improve the outcome results including the identification of resources that are indicated.

 

The term AC will appear at the end of SLO, SSLO, AUO, etc. indicating the complete cycle as opposed to just the outcome statement.

 Certificate Level Outcome (CLO)

The De Anza administration, faulty and staff work in concert to define and assess Certificate Level Outcomes that are overarching, clear, and assessable statements that identify and define what a student will be able to know, do or feel at the successful completion of a specific certificate. The CLOs appear in the De Anza catalogue under each certificate.

 Degree Level Outcome (DLO)

The De Anza administration, faulty and staff work in concert to define and assess Certificate Level Outcomes that are overarching, clear, and assessable statements that identify and define what a student will be able to know, do or feel at the successful completion of a specific degree. The DLOs appear in the De Anza‘s catalogue under each degree.

 Hybrid Programs

Hybrid Programs offer both curriculum and services to students.  Hybrid programs (APE, EDC, Counseling/Matriculation, HOPE, Student Success Center, Learning Resources, Athletics) conduct both SLOAC and SSLOAC.

Institution Learning Outcome (ILO)

Institutional Learning Outcomes are aimed at assessing to what extent the Institutional Core Competencies (ICC) and Institutional Strategic Initiatives are being met.

These are assessed through the process of mapping each program level outcome to one or more ICC or Strategic Initiatives. The ICC are also assessed through direct and indirect methods.  The College Planning Committee (CPC) is charged with the oversight of these college-wide assessments.

Programs

Programs are currently defined as any area or department that conducted a Comprehensive Program Review (CPR) in 2008-09.

Program Level Outcome (PLO)

A PLO states what the student should be able to know, do, or feel at the completion of a program, certificate, or degree. These statements for certificates and degrees are included in De Anza‘s catalogue (see CLO/DLO). Course SLO statements are linked to PLO statements, thus only programs with curriculum have PLOs.

Student Learning Outcome (SLO)

The De Anza faculty defines and assesses Student Learning Outcomes that are overarching, clear, and assessable statements that identify and define what a student is able to do at the successful completion of a specific course, program, activity, or process. These outcomes may involve a combination of knowledge, skills/abilities, and/or attitudes that display behavioral evidence that learning has occurred at a specific level of competency. The ongoing assessment of

Student Learning Outcomes is specifically linked to the De Anza College Mission, Institutional Core Competencies, program review, and the planning and budget process, including Strategic and Educational Master Planning efforts.  All courses have SLO statements.  A SLOAC is not complete until all of a course's SLO have been assessed.

Student (Support) Services Learning Outcome (SSLO)

The De Anza faculty, staff, and administration work in concert to define and assess Student (or in some cases Support) Services Learning Outcomes that are overarching, clear, and assessable statements that identify and define what a student will be able to know, do, or feel at the successful completion of a specific program, activity, or process. In general, programs that directly work with students and/or play an academic support role (Financial Aid, EOPS, Outreach etc.) will conduct AUO assessment cycles.

Revised 2/20/12 JH


Governance

Governance is the ongoing and integrated process of planning and decision-making. Based on the assumption that the active participation of all constituent groups and consideration of diverse viewpoints are essential for effective college planning, governance at De Anza College includes faculty, staff, students, and administrators.


 

Glossary 5-6-11; revised 5/25/11; revised 3/14/12



Governance
Building: ADM 127
Contact: Tina Woo
Phone: 408.864.8705
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Last Updated: 3/14/12