Classified Senate

Classified Senate

Communications Reading List

De Anza Classified Senate Communication Committee presents:

Follow the Reader… 

In response to the Communication Survey from the 2011 Classified Professional retreat, a book list has been developed addressing the topic of organizational communication.

We asked five of our “favorite readers” to share a favorite book about communication. Take a moment to read through the list and if interested, the De Anza College Bookstore has a limited supply of these titles for purchase.

Click on a title to skip to a description of the book.


Really? … Did you just say that?

Jackie Reza and Karen Chow recommend two books that call attention to how the things we say affect communication in our diverse society:

Jackie Reza, Director, Staff and Organizational Development, picks:

Ouch! That Stereotype Hurts... Communicating Respectfully in a Diverse World, by Leslie C. Aguilar

Q: Why do you recommend this book?

I recommend this book because it’s 76 pages of easy fun reading of pithy, quick, practical and eminently applicable ideas for addressing those small (and sometimes large) pesky diversity issues. It is chock full of checklists and questions to help us be aware in any conversation – For example the phrase isn’t it just PC? The author takes us from being Politically Correct to Professionally Competent and Personally Conscious. She takes the adversity of Diversity out of the equation and brings joy to the work of inclusion.

A: How can the information in this book be applied to communication issues at De Anza College? 

We have stated and continue to state in our mission statement and our core competencies that we are committed to inclusion and respect. This book shows the reader how to apply those lofty ideas in our everyday interactions with each other and with our students. Throughout the book the reader is given suggestions, how to avoid pitfalls and use language that is inclusive, to recover when things go wrong and lots of techniques and strategies to speak up against bias without blame or guilt.


Karen Chow, Language Arts Faculty and Academic Senate President, suggests:

35 Dumb Things Well-Intended People Say: Surprising Things We Say That Widen the Diversity Gap, by Maura Cullen.

Q: Why do you recommend this book?

This book addresses many things people say that do damage to progress toward respectful, inclusive, productive, institutional culture and ultimately widens, rather than narrows, the diversity gap.

A: How can the information in this book be applied to communication issues at De Anza College? 

It would help people to identify and understand why certain things you often hear people say are hurtful—even if well intentioned. This book can help to identify why we feel awkward when we hear a well-intentioned comment and to identify how many times, these comments have the opposite effect.

 

You can’t beat this book, recommended by Edmundo Norte, Dean of International/Intercultural Studies, to learn more about interpersonal communication:

Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life, by Marshall B. Rosenberg.

Q: Why do you recommend this book?

Because everyone has relationships they care about, even if they can be challenging, because most of us have a deep longing to live and act in integrity with our deepest values (especially in situations of conflict), because it would be a gift for most of us to possess a set of principles and skills that can engage conflicts in a way that results in greater understanding and connection, because such tools provide a practical application of “emotional intelligence,” and because we have the possibility of learning and applying these tools here to support the development of a more collaborative, mutually supportive and sustainable De Anza College community that I want to be a part of, I recommend this book.

A: How can the information in this book be applied to communication issues at De Anza College? 

Because every organization and community is ultimately shaped by the quality and character of the relationships of the people involved, the principles and practices captured in this book could be a major contribution to the heart and spirit of the people of De Anza by providing tools for speaking even our difficult truths with clarity and compassion.

 

Is Death By Meeting the theme of your life right now? If so, Chancellor Linda Thor recommends:

Death by Meeting by Patrick Lencioni.

Q: Why do you recommend this book?

I recommend this book because it addresses a fundamental problem in all organizations--boring and unproductive meetings. The book is a fun, easy read, written as a fable. However, in the second part, it also contains a clear presentation of the model, including structure and keys to success.

A: How can the information in this book be applied to communication issues at De Anza College? 
Meetings are dreaded by most people, yet they are the vehicle by which we conduct a great deal of our business. Lencioni proposes four types of meetings to address the different needs we have for meeting--daily check-in, weekly tactical, monthly strategic and quarterly off-site review. Being clear about the type of meeting we are holding and how it should be structured will lead to more effective and energized meetings (and participants).

 

Do you ever feel “trampled by elephants” in the workplace? If so, Berta Pace, Division Administrative Assistant, Business and Computer Systems and Classified Senator recommends:

The Thin Book of Naming Elephants: How to Surface Undiscussables for Greater Organizational Success, by Sue Annis Hammond and Andrea B. Mayfield.

Q: Why do you recommend this book?

This is an excellent book about the elephant (Undiscussables) in the room that everybody sees, but no one talks about. It is filled with guidelines and suggestions, to overcome organizational resistance to telling it like it is. I recommend this book because it contains straightforward advice on what to do and how to "name" and then discuss the elephants and their implications.

A: How can the information in this book be applied to communication issues at De Anza College? 

I believe that we all have an obligation to cultivate more organizational effectiveness through improved communication in our De Anza community. The Thin Book of Naming Elephants provides an excellent source and outline of why and how each of us, who have a stake in the success of our college, can promote effective progress through improved communication.

 

All books available for purchase in the De Anza Bookstore.

Death by Meeting,by Patrick Lencioni

Ouch! That Stereotype Hurts…Communicating Respectfully in a Diverse World, by Leslie C. Aguilar

35 Dumb Things Well-Intended People Say: Surprising Things We Say That Widen the Diversity Gap, by Maura Cullen

The Thin Book of Naming Elephants: How to Surface Undiscussables for Greater Organizational Success, by Sue Annis Hammond and Andrea B. Mayfield

Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life, by Marshall B. Rosenberg



Classified Senate
Contact: Virginia Marquez
Phone: 408.864.8829
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Last Updated: 5/8/12